This website has no other purpose than to display Chris Barclay's apparent lack of writing talent.

Halloween

Halloween

Those of us who grew up with scary stories by candlelight, dares to walk into the haunted house of the neighborhood, and friends who hold the bathroom door shut while chanting "BLOODY MARY BLOODY MARY BLOODY—" cherish childhood memories of Halloween. It's a season of FEAR and DISGUST and BLOOD and CANDY! But childhood memories are just that. Memories of Childhood. In teenage years—unless your friends take you out to haunted houses or Halloween parties—you're stuck handing out candy or sleeping.

It's funny. Every other month of the year I've enjoyed reading/listening to creepy pastas. They're chilling, exciting, exhilarating, thought-provoking. I know how I want to begin this sentence. "But with school and tech crew and homework and studying—" I get it. I haven't "had the chance" to go Halloween shopping—unless absolutely necessary—or partying or out with friends. The one Halloween party I was invited to I skipped to study. Pathetic? Maybe. But that's our reality. When you grow up, Halloween becomes boring.

Halloween isn't boring. I know this because at one point in time it felt necessary and maybe essential to have a Halloween costume, to grab as much candy as possible, and to have the fun that Halloween is designed to give us. I guess in the bigger picture, Halloween represents more than just a silly tradition held by millions to have a good time. It represents society's outlook on the idea of having fun. It's held in moderation mostly in childhood and gets tougher and tougher to have when people get older. Think about it. You had more fun during virtually all the holidays when you were younger. Why?

My explanation is simple. Less emphasis is put upon holidays, and we gradually begin to lose our fervency. We slip into the belief that we can "do it later" or that "work is too important" or that "I'll have fun next year". But when next year comes, it's junior year or you've been promoted or you're too grown up for any of it. It's sad. You don't feel sad, though. In fact, you don't even feel anything. You're indifferent, and that's truly sad. I don't feel sad either. I know I should, though.

It's 12:12am. The last time I checked the clock it was 12:00am. I've spent the last hour or two doing 2 things: watching scary videos and snapchat-ing friends my reactions. That's been my Halloween experience. It felt good though, just that small peek into the Halloween fun I used to have as a kid. I felt the rush as a disfigured mannequin stared at me and I felt as though it could see me. I felt chills running down my neck as I peered outside my window and put my hand on the back of my laptop so I could shut it tight if it got too scary. I felt happy.

I urge you—no, I urge MYSELF—to have fun tomorrow, er, today. It's a Monday morning, Halloween, and I have school. I already bought a costume I put little effort into, but it'll do. I don't know exactly what my game plan is, but I want to have fun. I want to do a witch ritual, summon a demon, and tell stories by the fire. I guess I should sleep. Idk, that's just my thoughts. I should be publishing an article on Wednesday about death and sleep deprivation. Stay tuned.

love, Chris (on Halloween, October 31st, 2016)

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